Category: Flooring

Must Choose The Best Carpet Flooring For Your Livingroom

Must Choose The Best Carpet Flooring For Your Livingroom

tips for choosing carpet

A good-quality carpet takes a floor from workable to homely. It instantly transforms a space, softening the look of a room and absorbing noise to create a cosy environment. But choosing the best carpet for your home can be somewhat of a minefield, from pile types to colours – the options are seemingly endless.

CONSIDER THE WAY YOU LIVE

If you have a young family and pets then look for a hard-wearing carpet in a forgiving colour, such as a textured loop pile or a quality hard-twist cut. If you’re a couple looking for a touch of luxury, you might opt for a plush pile in a flat colour. If you’re an entertainer, a combination cut and loop pile in mid-to-dark tones or a stippled cut pile would suit

THINK ABOUT PLUSH PILES

Cut piles include plush piles, which are super soft and look like velvet. If you want that squishy, luxurious feeling then dense, plush-pile carpets are lovely, but bear in mind they show footprints.

TAKE A LOOK AT LOOP PILES

Loop piles are exactly that; the yarn is formed into loops. There are lots of variations: some have a formal, linear look, some have a ribbed pattern, giving them a sisal look. Random loop piles give the carpet a textured, casual look.

MIX IT UP

Combination cut and loop pile carpets, where the contrasting textures create a light and dark pattern are less likely to show footprints and have a lovely texture underfoot

 

Carpet Selection: Things You Must Know

Carpet dealers usually carry samples of many carpet lines from multiple mills and manufacturers in their showrooms. You’ll see a range of quality when you begin your carpet search. Your best bet is to educate yourself and research your options before you head to the store. Then, you’re sure to get a quality carpet that provides comfort, durability and beauty far into the future

What You Should Know:

By asking these questions, the dealer is trying to gauge which grade and style of carpet would work best for your home

Try to give a detailed picture of your expectations for the carpet. Is it important that the carpet stand up to pets, running children and bustling activity? Or are you mainly concerned about how it will look and feel in a formal living room that doesn’t get a lot of use?

How much use will the room get? (This is a consideration because a heavily used room may not be the best place to install white or very light-colored carpet.)

Are kids going to be playing down on the floor? Or is it a formal room that doesn’t get much use? (Again, lighter colors my create more maintenance but another factor the dealer is trying to consider is whether you should choose carpet made with BCF fiber so that children playing on the floor will not find themselves covered in loose fibers shed from staple products.)

 

Unbiased Carpet Buying Guide

A little background: It began as a project to help my father’s carpet cleaning customers when it came time for them to buy new carpet. He wanted a website to recommend to his customers when they were shopping for carpet, but all the sites we found either were incomplete or biased (trying to sell you a certain carpet, pad, or stain treatment).

So we decided to create our own site helping people buy carpet, and here it is. It’s been edited over the years to respond to our readers feedback, include new carpet technology, and just be more helpful.

Of course, this is all for free.  The site is supported by advertisements, and it can be assumed where there is a link to a product or service, I make a small commission. However, I only recommend products and services I believe in and apreciate your support. If you’d like to help out in any other way, I’m trying to get Pinterest off the ground, and more followers = more motivation.

Get estimated initial projects costs. You can start planning financing and budgeting. This step comes first because you need to know what you’re getting into financially. If you don’t, it will be difficult to determine what type of carpet you’ll need, when to buy, etc.

Plan the perfect carpet and pad for your home. This is the “meat and potatoes” of carpet shopping. You’ll learn what makes durable carpet and padding, and based on your home’s needs, what you’d be over-paying for. You’ll know what matters in carpet better than 90% of salesmen—and promise no sales pitch.

 

Wall-to-Wall Carpet Buying Guide

Buying the right type of carpet for a room in your home involves more than finding a style in the color you like. You first will need to consider your lifestyle—what you typically do in that room—location, material, construction, and upkeep. Carpet manufacturers have responded to homeowners’ desire for great looks, value, and easy maintenance with many innovations and options in recent years.

Selection

When shopping, think function first. Ask yourself a few questions when choosing your carpeting type

Answers to these questions will help you begin to determine the best fiber for your carpet as well as texture, construction, and even color.

Fiber Facts

The type of fiber used determines the basic performance and appearance of the carpet. The biggest trend today is: soft. Homeowners seek comfort, and carpet offers a cushion underfoot. It also suppresses noise. The fiber content is usually listed on a specification sheet on the back of the sample. While names may differ among manufacturers, products still fall within one of five basic categories.

Wool

Wool, the granddaddy of all soft floorcoverings, retains its legacy of luxury. Natural and made from woven construction, it offers a greater range of designs, detail, and color than a traditional tufted carpet. Expect good stain resistance as long as you treat it as soon as something is dropped on it. It also has inherent flame retardant characteristics

 

Carpet Buying Guide

How to Choose the Best Type of Carpet for Your Home

Carpets are part of what makes a home truly feel like a home. The flooring of a house says a lot about it. The right balance seems to give each space that cozy, comfortable feeling. When you are building or remodeling your home, your flooring choices can easily become overwhelming. You have to consider things like allergies, pets, your family and which rooms get the most traffic. As you browse, how do you know which material or style of carpet is right? This guide covers several factors you should consider to help you make the best choice

What Are Piles?

Piles describe how manufacturers use the fibers to make the carpet. The yarn is usually looped or cut to a certain length and twisted to stay in place. There are several pile styles with different textures. Some will hide dirt more easily, while others track and wear down quickly. When you choose one for your home, consider the amount of traffic and how you plan to use the room.

Cut Pile

A cut pile carpet has straight strands that are cut and twisted. It tends to be fairly soft, which means you can see marks such as footprints and vacuum streaks.

Low Pile Carpet

The height affects the wear, appearance and feel of the material. A short pile carpet has yarn cut to 0.25” or less.

Plush Carpet

The plush style is trimmed off so that yarn ends poke up. Saxony plush, one of the most popular varieties, has short tufts that are densely packed to look like a thick carpet. It doesn’t tend to wear as well as loops.

Find The Way To Make Tile Flooring

Find The Way To Make Tile Flooring

How Long Does It Take To Install Tile Floors?

How long it takes to install a tile floor depends on several things, including the skill level of the worker, the material and the size of the room. According to experts, it takes a beginner about 16 hours to lay ceramic or stone tiles in an average room. A person with intermediate skills takes about 12 hours and experts, such as our Lewisville professionals at Pro Flooring, take about 10. This doesn’t even add in the hours it takes to prepare a subfloor, which takes a pro about 4 hours.

The right way to buy tiles is to measure the area of the floor, and add about 10 percent to the number to allow for the inevitable broken tiles. Also, we tell our customers to make sure that all of the tiles have the same dye lot number, if that’s appropriate.

 

Subfloor vs. Underlayment

It is important to distinguish the components of a flooring system in order to understand the best installation practices for ceramic tile. Except for slab floors, any flooring system consists of three primary components: the joists or structural support component; the subfloor, which is usually a layer of OSB (oriented strand board) or plywood; and the underlayment, a final layer that lies just beneath the surface flooring and which is selected to match the needs of the flooring material. Not every floor has all three components. In a home with a concrete slab foundation, or in basements, ceramic tile is often installed directly over the concrete slab.

In any flooring installation, but for ceramic tile in particular, the success of the flooring depends largely on the quality of the underlying support system. There are six subfloor/underlayment structures that are widely accepted for ceramic tile floors.

 

Tiling Challenges

  • Dry thinset mortar is cheap, but it is also difficult to mix. The solution is to buy pre-mixed mortar. While significantly more expensive, pre-mixed thinset saves you from the aggravation of getting water-to-thinset measurements correct. Plus, mixing up dry thinset is physically difficult.
  • Your tile work is only as good as your substrate or subfloor. If you do not have a good subfloor, your tile will not lie flat. Lippage will occur—adjoining tile edges that are not the same height. Even worse, a base floor that is not solid enough will eventually cause the tile to crack.
  • Perimeter tiles will need to be cut. You can use either a wet tile saw or what is often colloquially called a snap tile cutter for this. More likely, you will want to use both types of tile-cutting tools. If you happen to have any bad cuts, you can position them so that the ragged cut falls under a baseboard or under a cabinet toe kick overhang.
  • Even tiles within the perimeter can be difficult. They do not automatically fall into straight lines: you need to impose this.
  • Laying tiles on a diagonal. Diagonal tile cutting can be a frustrating experience for the novice tiler.
  • Spacing tiles correctly is hard. Be sure to use plastic tile spacers to impose the correct distance. While spacers are a pain to remove, they ensure perfect spacing of tile seams.
  • Constantly being on your knees on a hard surface can affect the quality of your work. For this reason alone it is worth purchasing an inexpensive pair of tiler’s knee pads.

 

How to prepare a plywood subfloor

Measure the space and cut cement backer board to fit. Adhere the backer board to the plywood with thinset adhesive, leaving a 1/8” gap between the sheets, and a 1/4” gap around the edges of the room. Make sure the seams of the backer board don’t align with the seams of the wood subfloor.

Next, fasten the backer board to the floor with screws spaced six to eight inches apart. Set the screw heads beneath the surface of the board to ensure that it’s completely level.

Use glass fiber tape specifically made for backer board to reinforce the joints. If the tape is non-adhesive, fill the gaps between the boards with mortar before applying the tape. Finally, cover the tape with a thin layer of mortar and allow it to dry completely before proceeding.

 

Why are tiles soaked in water before use?

Soaking the tiles isn’t always what you want to do. If you are using an epoxy or some other kind of mastic adhesive, soaking the tile will just weaken the adherence. However, if you are using Portland cement based mud-set or thin-set mortar, and your tile is stone or unglazed ceramic, then by soaking the tile, you ensure that it doesn’t weaken the join between itself and the cement by pulling water from the cement.

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